Ivor O’Connor

January 13, 2009

MD5 Is Officially Insecure

Filed under: Uncategorized — ioconnor @ 11:58 am

Something to keep in mind.
Security experts have known about the possibility for MD5 collisions since at least 2004. Until now, however, the vulnerability was dismissed as a theoretical possibility due to the amount of CPU time needed to attack a single hash for collisions. The 25C3 presenters claim they were able to run the attack in only four weekends, using a network of 200 PlayStation 3 game consoles at a cost of $657.

For about $2,000, said the presenters, an attacker could pull off a similar attack using Amazon’s cloud-computing EC2 service, and the attack would take about a day.

While many CAs have moved on to the more secure SHA-1 or SHA-2 algorithms, a handful of issuers have not. Of the brands still using MD5, the researchers found approximately 97% of those certificates to be signed by Verisign-owned low-cost CA RapidSSL. Other companies using MD5 include FreeSSL, Thawte, and Verisign.co.jp.

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